Developing software in the Real World

Running Slim 4 in a subdirectory

If you want to run Slim 4 in a subdirectory of your website, then you have a few things you need to do. Let's consider the situation: Your main website is in the directory /var/www/html and is accessed at https://example.com/. You want your new Slim 4 app to be in the directory /var/www/html/myapp and to be accessed at https://example.com/myapp. Your Slim 4 index.php file is stored in /var/www/html/myapp. There are two things you need to… continue reading.

Slim4-empty: minimal Slim 4 starting point

To simplify creating a new Slim 4 project, I've created slim4-empty which does this for me. To use it:

and you're done! The my-new-project directory is created and contains Slim 4 along with a minimally viable public/index.php to get you going. You can then run it with the PHP built-in server:

And navigate to https://localhost:8888 to view "Hello World" in your browser. What does it contain? Slim4-empty provides no structure to your project… continue reading.

Receiving input into a Slim 4 application

A Slim 4 (and Slim 3) application receives data from three places: Any query parameters on the URL (the key-value pairs after the ?) The HTTP message's body (usually for POST and PUT) messages Parameters in the URL (such as the 3 in https://example.com/users/3 Within the application, these are available within the PSR-7 Request object. Let's start with a simple Slim 4 application. Firstly we require the Slim framework and a PSR-7 implementation:

Now… continue reading.

Automatically mounting a network drive on Mac

I have so many photos that I can't store them all on my hard drive and keep them on my NAS. While on my home network, it would be convenient to automatically mount the NAS folder onto my Mac as I keep forgetting before I open Lightroom. Usually I would use automount to do this, but Lightroom cannot see automounted folders, so I decided to use a combination of AppleScript and Keyboard Maestro. Mount a… continue reading.

A first look at Slim 4

With Slim 4 we have continued the tradition of allowing you to use the framework in the way that best fits you and your project. You can create a Slim application entirely in a single file suitable for prototyping through to a few files for a simple web hook or serverless action all the way to fully-decoupled application suitable for the enterprise. From my point of view, the big changes with Slim 4 are: Support… continue reading.

Displaying exif information in WordPress posts

After discovering that WordPress modifies img tags when rendering a page, it crossed my mind that I could display exif information underneath each image on my new photography blog. The basic process is applicable to any manipulation of the content that you would want to do before it is displayed. To do this, we add a new filter to the the_content hook:

As with all filters, we have to return data in the same… continue reading.

Images and WordPress

My new WordPress project has multiple photographs per post and as I wanted them to work in an efficient manner for multiple screen resolutions. The secret to this is the srcset and sizes attributes on the img tag. It turns out that WordPress will create multiple sized thumbnails when you upload an image. It will also add the srcset and sizes attributes into your img tags for you if your image tag has a class… continue reading.

Developing WordPress sites with Docker

I recently set up a new WordPress based website and local Docker-based development environment. This post documents what I did, so that I can do it again next time! As I'm not in the WordPress world, many things are strange to me and I'm indebted to Jenny Wong for pointing me in the right direction on numerous occasions and being very patient with my questions! Thanks Jenny! Project organisation There's always ancillary files and directories… continue reading.

Creating virtual environments with Pyenv

rst2pdf is a Python 2 application that we're making compatible with Python 3. When developing Python applications, I've found it useful to be able to switch python versions easily and also set up clean environments to work in. To do this, I currently use pyenv. This is how I set it up: Install Pyenv On my Mac, I install pyenv & its sister project pyenv-virtualenv with Homebrew: $ brew install readline xz $ brew install… continue reading.